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The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude, except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

except as punishment for a crime.

Think about who’s in jail and why. 

(via amerikkkan-stories)

and that “crime” could be anything they felt like charging you with

(via boygeorgemichaelbluth)

This was how the myth of Black criminality started, for the record. After the abolition of slavery, a lot of states made laws targeting Black people specifically, and then put them on chain gangs to get free labor from them.

Oh, and the US is still disproportionately incarcerating Black people and private prisons are making huge amounts off them.

(via bunnybotbaby)

This is one of those pieces of information I wish had like 200 million notes on tumblr.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

meanwhile the dea teamed up with the cca

(via cxnfvsed-and-cxnflicted)

Yeah, I believe that black people are twice as likely to be arrested and convicted for committing the same crimes as a white person. Draw your own conclusions.

(via yesiamtheblack)

Reblogging this because everytime in real life I’ve said Slavery didn’t really end I’ve been dismissed as crazy.

(via locsgirl)

I’ll reblog this every time it comes up on my dash. People need to know!

(via andshegotthegirl)

tiaralovesrkandthings:

“Racism is not dead. It’s not. And that’s why this film is so important. To understand American society today, it starts with these kinds of stories, and the fact that they haven’t been dealt with yet. There’s work to be done. There are apologies that need to be sought and apologies that need to be offered. And that’s on a political level and a social level and an individual level and a communal level”
                     -Lupita Nyong’o
tiaralovesrkandthings:

“Racism is not dead. It’s not. And that’s why this film is so important. To understand American society today, it starts with these kinds of stories, and the fact that they haven’t been dealt with yet. There’s work to be done. There are apologies that need to be sought and apologies that need to be offered. And that’s on a political level and a social level and an individual level and a communal level”
                     -Lupita Nyong’o
tiaralovesrkandthings:

“Racism is not dead. It’s not. And that’s why this film is so important. To understand American society today, it starts with these kinds of stories, and the fact that they haven’t been dealt with yet. There’s work to be done. There are apologies that need to be sought and apologies that need to be offered. And that’s on a political level and a social level and an individual level and a communal level”
                     -Lupita Nyong’o

tiaralovesrkandthings:

Racism is not dead. It’s not. And that’s why this film is so important. To understand American society today, it starts with these kinds of stories, and the fact that they haven’t been dealt with yet. There’s work to be done. There are apologies that need to be sought and apologies that need to be offered. And that’s on a political level and a social level and an individual level and a communal level

                     -Lupita Nyong’o

stuntqueening:

manif3stlove:

whiteboyfunksucks:

What inspired you to make Brenda’s Got A Baby?

“I was reading the New York Post when I was doing the movie Juice and it was this story - it started out to be this big story about this family who died because they didn’t have heat and they left the gas on. Everybody died except for this this girl who moved in with her cousin. (Second cousin.) She started dating her second cousin. He got her pregnant. Nobody knew that she was pregnant, and I was like “dag!” And it was over a week, but the story kept getting smaller and smaller and smaller. And I was like, “This is very important. More important than Juice, to me! It was a bigger story than Juice!

And right now, nobody talks about that. No young black male… No black males talk about black females like we should. We need to take more responsibilities for our sisters because if we don’t, who will? Because if you look at it now, black females are held lower of the totem pole than anybody.”

Ain’t nobody hearing you though.

He said this in 92, literally nothing has changed.

(Source: nubiansista)

Art has to be a kind of confession. I don’t mean a true confession in the sense of that dreary magazine. The effort it seems to me, is: if you can examine and face your life, you can discover the terms with which you are connected to other lives, and they can discover them, too — the terms with which they are connected to other people. This has happened to every one of us, I’m sure. You read something which you thought only happened to you, and you discovered it happened 100 years ago to Dostoyevsky. This is a very great liberation for the suffering, struggling person, who always thinks that they are alone. This is why art is important. Art would not be important if life were not important, and life is important. Most of us, no matter what we say, are walking in the dark, whistling in the dark. Nobody knows what is going to happen to them from one moment to the next, or how one will bear it. This is irreducible. And it’s true for everybody. Now, it is true that the nature of society is to create, among its citizens, an illusion of safety; but it is also absolutely true that the safety is always necessarily an illusion. Artists are here to disturb the peace. They have to disturb the peace. Otherwise, chaos.
James Baldwin in an interview in 1961 (via steadfastinexile)

blvcknvy:

They made ​​fun of your name and you have changed your name.

They made ​​fun of your clothes and you changed clothes.

They made ​​fun of your hair and you have straighten your hair.

They made ​​fun of your skin and you bought skinn brighteners. 

They made ​​fun of your languages ​​and you have adopted their own.

They made ​​fun of your religion and you have embraced theirs.

Who taught you to hate the texture of your hair?

Who taught you to hate the color of your skin? to the extent that you bleach to be like the white man.

Who taught you to hate the shape of your nose and the shape of your lips?

Who taught you to hate the top of your head to the soles of your feet?

Who taught you to hate your being? to hate the land of your ancestors, to hate the race you belong to, such a point that you do not want to be next to each other.

When will we realize? When will be a humanity?

Gurrrl, You Just Have to Read This! The 2013 Clutch Reading Challenge

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

  1. Krik! Krak! by Edwidge Danticat (Fiction)
  2. Caucasia by Danzy Senna (Fiction)
  3. Sister Citizen by Melissa Harris Perry (Nonfiction)
  4. Praisesong for the Widow by Paule Marshall (Fiction)
  5. The Upper Room by Mary Monroe (Fiction)
  6. One Crazy Summer by Rita Williams-Garcia (Children’s Books)
  7. Ugly Ways by Tina McElroy Ansa (Fiction)
  8. Hair Story: Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America by Lori Tharps and Ayana Byrd (Nonfiction)
  9. Wench by Dolen Perkins-Valdez (Fiction)
  10. Small Island by Andrea Levy (Fiction)
  11. Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (Fiction)
  12. On Beauty by Zadie Smith (Fiction)
  13. Taste of Power: A Black Woman’s Story by Elaine Brown (Nonfiction)
  14. A Street in Bronzeville by Gwendolyn Brooks (Poetry)
  15. Mama Day by Gloria Naylor (Fiction)
  16. Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler (Science Fiction)
  17. Breath, Eye, Memory by Edwidge Danticat (Fiction)
  18. Daughters by Paule Marshall (Fiction)
  19. Sula by Toni Morrison (Fiction)
  20. The Color Purple by Alice Walker (Fiction)
  21. Naughts and Crosses trilogy by Malorie Blackman (Fiction)
  22. Coming to England by Floella Benjamin (Autobiography)
  23. But Some of Us Are Brave by Gloria Hull, Patricia Bell Scott and Barbara Smith (Nonfiction)
  24. Annie Allen by Gwendolyn Brooks (Poetry)
  25. Silver Sparrow by Tayari Jones (Fiction)
  26. 32 Candles by Ernessa T. Carter (Fiction)
  27. The Fisher King by Paule Marshall (Fiction)
  28. Before You Suffocate your own Fool Self by Danielle Evans (Fiction)
  29. Our Black Year: One Family’s Quest to Buy Black in a Racially Divided Economy by Maggie Anderson (Nonfiction)
  30. The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander (Nonfiction)
  31. Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson (Nonfiction)
  32. Abeng by Michelle Cliff (Fiction)
  33. Brewster Place by Gloria Naylor (Fiction)
  34. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison (Fiction)
  35. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings by Maya Angelou (Autobiography)
  36. Black, White & Jewish: Autobiography of a Shifting Self by Rebecca Walker (Nonfiction)
  37. This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color by Various (Nonfiction)
  38. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (Fiction)
  39. The Skin I’m In by Sharon G. Flake (Children’s Books)
  40. The Shimmershine Queens by Camille Yarbrough (Children’s Books)
  41. Darkest Child by Dolores Philips (Fiction)
  42. The Black Notebooks: An Interior Journey by Toi Derricotte (Nonfiction)
  43. Gathering of Waters by Bernice McFadden (Fiction)
  44. Corregidora by Gayl Jones (Fiction)
  45. The Cutting Season by Attica Locke (Fiction)
  46. The Other Side of Paradise: A Memoir by Staceyann Chin (Autobiography)
  47. Are Prisons Obsolete by Angela Davis (Nonfiction)
  48. Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde (Nonfiction)
  49. Coffee Will Make You Black by April Sinclair (Fiction)
  50. Zami—A New Spelling of My Name by Audre Lorde (“Biomythography”)
  51. Black Girl in Paris by Shay Youngblood (Fiction)
  52. In Search of Our Mother’s Gardens by Alice Walker (Nonfiction)
  53. To Be Young, Gifted and Black by Lorraine Hansberry (Autobiography)
  54. Her Stories: African American Folktlaes, Fairy Tales and True Tales by Virginia Hamilton (Fiction)
  55. The Dark Thirty: Southern Tales of the Supernatural by Patricia McKissak (Fiction)
  56. Wrapped in Rainbows by Valerie Boyd (Biography)
  57. Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor (Children’s Books)
  58. Betsy Brown by Ntozake Shange (Fiction)
  59. Kindred by Octavia Butler (Science Fiction)
  60. Baby of the Family by Tina McElroy Ansa (Fiction)
  61. Cane River by
  62. Lalita Tademy (Nonfiction)
  63. Daughter by asha bandele (Fiction)
  64. Some Things I Never Thought I’d Do by Pearl Cleage (Fiction)
  65. The Joys of Motherhood by Buchi Emecheta (Fiction)
  66. Homegirls and Handgrenades by Sonia Sanchez (Poetry)
  67. Efrain’s Secret by Sofia Quintero (YA)
  68. When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost by Joan Morgan (Nonfiction)
  69. The Collector of Treasures and Other Botswana Village Tales by Bessie Head (Fiction)
  70. The Collected Poetry by Nikki Giovanni (Poetry)
  71. Jubilee by Margaret Walker (Nonfiction)
  72. Home Girls: A Black Feminist Anthology by Barbara Smith (Nonfiction)
  73. The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives by Lola Shoneyin (Fiction)
  74. For Colored Girls Who’ve Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow is Enuf by Ntozake Shange (Fiction)
  75. Moral Combat: Black Atheists, Gender Politics and Values Wars by Sikivu Hutchinson (Nonfiction)
  76. The Hand I Fan With by Tina McElroy Ansa (Fiction)
  77. Deals with the Devil and other Reasons to Riot by Pearl Cleage (Nonfiction)
  78. Kehinde by Buchi Emecheta (Fiction)
  79. NW by Zadie Smith (Fiction)
  80. The Temple of My Familiar by Alice Walker (Fiction)
  81. Sisters of the Yam: Black Women and Self-Recovery by bell hooks (Nonfiction)
  82. Lucy by Jamaica Kincaid (Fiction)
  83. Ain’t I A Woman by bell hooks (Nonfiction)
  84. The Street by Ann Petry (Fiction)
  85. Daddy Was a Number Runner by Louise Meriweather
  86. Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriett Jacobs
  87. Women, Race and Class by Angela Davis (Nonfiction)
  88. White Teeth by Zadie Smith
  89. Black Macho and the Myth of the Superwoman by Michelle Wallace(Nonfiction)
  90. Some Love, Some Pain, Sometime by J.California Cooper (Fiction)
  91. Meridian by Alice Walker (Nonfiction)
  92. The Killing Moon by N.K. Jemisin
  93. Who Fears Death by Nnedi Okorafor (Fiction)
  94. Homemade Love by J. California Cooper (Fiction)
  95. Bitch is the New Black: A Memoir by Helena Andrews (Autobiography)
  96. Color Blind: A Memoir by Precious Williams (Autobiography)
  97. On Black Sisters Street by Chika Unigwe (Fiction)
  98. Oh Her Own Ground: The Life and Times of Madam CJ Walker by A’lelia Bundles (Biography)
  99. Yurugu: An African-Centered Critique of European Cultural Thought and Behavior by Dr. Marimba Ani (Nonfiction)
  100. Song of Solomon by Toni Morrison (Fiction)
  101. Parable of the Talents by Octavia Butler (Science Fiction)

Thoughts? My first one is that people need to open their eyes beyond Octavi Butler, case there is LOTS of black women writing sci-fi and fantasy and horror that they keep missing. Granted this was based on a poll, which points out the visibility problem. That being said, nice mix of fiction and nonfiction.

frankethor:

zuky:

did-you-kno:

Source

The Scott sisters will remain on parole and be required to pay the state of Florida $52 per month for the rest of their lives.

I think it is important to also mention that they were released under the condition that one sister donate an organ to the other sister to save her life after neglect and abuse by the prison staff caused her health to deteriorate.

Also, it should be noted that the witnesses to the crime repeatedly said that the sisters were not the ones who robbed the restaurant.

If I remember correctly, the two women are relatives of an activist, or something to that effect and may have been targeted just because the cops couldn’t get to the family member. As far as I recall, neither women were themselves activist.

I am surprised by how much sex I have had in my life that I didn’t want to have. Not exactly what’s considered “real” rape, or “date” rape, although it is a kind of rape of the spirit - a dishonest portrayal or distortion of my own desire in order to appease another person.

I said yes because I felt it was too much trouble to say no. I said yes because I didn’t want to have to defend my “no,” qualify it, justify it - deserve it. I said yes because I thought I was so ugly and fat that I should just take sex every time it was offered, because who knew when it would be offered again. I said yes to partners I never wanted in the first place, because to say no at any point after saying yes for so long would make our entire relationship a lie, so I had to keep saying yes in order to keep the “no” I felt a secret. That is such a messed-up way to live, such an awful way to love.

So these days, I say yes only when I mean yes. It does require some vigilance on my part to make sure I don’t just go on sexual automatic pilot and let people do whatever. It forces me to be really honest with myself and others. It makes me remember that loving myself is also about protecting myself and defending my own borders. I say yes to me.

Margaret Cho, “Yes Means Yes”  (via thewastedgeneration)

I cannot ever reblog this enough. It is unbearably personal.

(via the-red-headed-slut)

(Source: lalondes)

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